FAKE MI TEA PARTY ORGANIZERS INDICTED -- FREE PRESS ARTICLE

Two top Oakland County Democrat officials were indicted on charges of forgery and perjury on 3/16/2011 regarding the investigation into the Fake Tea Party petition scam leading up to the 2010 state and national elections.

 

Recall the background in the case:

  • Retired union steward, Mark Steffek, filed a petition with nearly 60,000 signatures to form "The Tea Party" in Michigan. Experts suspected that the effort cost well over $100,000 to launch.  Democrat Party vendors and volunteers were used to execute the petition drive.  This was NOT a grass roots effort by any accounts.
  • Mr. Steffak and his accomplices never attended an actual Tea Party event.  No legitimate Tea Party had ever heard of Mr. Steffak or his companions previously.
  • The MI State Board of Canvassers deadlocked along party lines effectively denying the petition.  Legitimate MI Tea Party groups testified in Lansing against the petition in the summer of 2010.
  • The Fake Tea Party organizers filed a lawsuit to move forward, but lost in the MI Supreme Court.
  • The Fake Tea Party fielded 23 candidates in key races throughout the state to split the vote in favor of the Democrats.  There were reports that the Fake Tea Party held its convention (as required by state law) with only three attendees, yet produced 23 candidates.
  • Two top Oakland County Democrat Party officials have been indicted 2011 for perjury and forgery in the case regarding the Fake Tea Party candidate registrations.

 

The below 3/17/2011 Detroit Free Press article discusses the indictments.

Tea Parties need to remain vigilant through 2012 and beyond since this case will most likely NOT be the last unethical and/or illegal effort to game the states' and federal election processes.

 

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